Notes on R-Z18 in Steppe Ancestry Pre-print

These are my notes from the pre-print Steppe Ancestry in western Eurasia and the spread of the Germanic Languages. It hasn’t been peer-reviewed. This is, at it’s heart, an autosomal study, but it does contain some Y-DNA information. They’re trying to identify population movements (along with language movements). They’re using ancient DNA to focus on …

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More Wandering Thoughts on Ancient DNA

Leaving behind Anglo-Saxon England, there are currently no R-CTS12023/R-DF95 ancient DNA results to look at and compare. It’s as if we popped up in England even though the results of the recent Anglo-Saxon DNA study clearly show an affinity for the continental North Sea and Baltic world. From here on out, we are back to …

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Wandering Thoughts on Ancient DNA

A fellow ZP121 person recently asked how many ZP121 men I thought might exist in the world. It’s a tricky question because there are about 57 men known now. Each might represent a family with tens or hundreds of living men. Y DNA testing is kind of a rich man’s game and a niche pursuit. …

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Navel-Gazing About the R-DF95 Jutes Part Two

In my previous post I swung back around to Dover, Kent, and the Jutes and tried to find evidence for their existence along with some explanation that would get them from the top of Jutland to the bottom of Brittain without seeming like they were lost. We established through myths and later writings of oral …

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Navel-Gazing About The R-DF95 Jutes

Three of the R-DF95/CTS12023 men from the Anglo-Saxon migration study show up in Kent. One of those men is on a Y male line that is currently very rare (R-PH1163), with only two modern testers. One tester is from Norway, and one is from Denmark. First, I want to make another note that R-DF95 is …

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T2A1A in the Early Middle Ages in England

Another follow-up on the Article on Anglo-Saxon migration and the formation of the early English gene pool. See my previous posts for more information on R-DF95 Y DNA and Continental Northern European migration to Britain part 1 and part 2. There are many T2a1a results in the supplemental data for the study. Some from Viking …

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It’s My Swamp – Anglo-Saxon DF95 Follow Up

I didn’t have to wait long to follow up on my previous post. The paper on The Anglo-Saxon migration and the formation of the early English gene pool is published along with supplementary data. The DF95/CTS12023 men in the samples were identified by the study itself. The work by citizen scientists has identified other SNPs …

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It’s My Swamp – DF95 in Anglo-Saxon England

Checking in on U106 I visited the U106 haplogroup tree and noticed something exciting in the Ancient DNA tab: The appearance of several R-CTS12023 (AKA R-DF95) samples…and one of them, to my complete shock, is a ZP121 (AKA Y15995) sample. Mind blown. We’re such a small group of men in Y DNA terms that I …

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Quirks of Y DNA and Migration

Y DNA (like MTDNA) has an amazing power to tell us who we’re most closely related to and sometimes where they live and how they got there. We can even guess at the spans of time between Y testers. I spend a lot of time speculating about what all that information means and openly wondering …

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Elmers, Aylmers and the Normans

Although I haven’t posted about it much here and I haven’t updated the Ed Elmer blogspot site in a while, we’re continuing to recruit members and add evidence and to shore up our discoveries using Autosomal and Y DNA. We have a broad range of interests in our small group. We have members whose Y …

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